Gourmet Veggie Mama

Tag Archives: Enchiladas

Weeknight Enchiladas

Enchiladas around our house are usually a weekend project. I do love me some chard enchiladas, but they do tend to be more time-intensive. The other night, though, I wanted enchiladas, and I didn’t want to spend a lot of time. Enter weeknight enchiladas.

Oh yeah, you can totally pull off enchiladas on a weeknight. You just have to be choosy with your ingredients. These are simple cheese enchiladas (studded with black olives for extra fun) smothered in a flavorful red sauce.*

Weeknight Enchiladas ~ Gourmet Veggie Mama

*Excuse the photo quality. These are the leftovers (which Nora and I were lucky enough to enjoy for lunch the next day), since I originally deemed this meal not “blog-worthy.” Then the hubby convinced me otherwise, and I’m glad he did, since it’s a handy little recipe.

Is it better if you make your own sauce? Absolutely. Do you have to? Not if you’re short on time and have access to good pre-prepared enchilada sauce. The only ones I’ve found that passes the taste test are Frontera‘s line of enchilada sauces. They come in a pouch rather than a can, and both the red chile and the green chile varieties are delicious — and, most importantly, don’t taste canned. (No, I was not compensated for saying that — I just like their stuff.)

You can pull these enchiladas off, start to finish, in 30 minutes. Can’t beat that! Serve them with a dollop of sour cream on top, plus refried beans and rice on the side. I like to jazz up plain brown rice with a can of green chiles and tomatoes (drained) and a bit of tomato paste. Enjoy!

Weeknight Enchiladas
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4-5
 
Ingredients
  • 8 oz colby jack cheese (can substitute cheddar or jack cheese)
  • 10 corn tortillas
  • 1 pouch Frontera red enchilada sauce
  • 1 small can sliced black olives (optional)
  • olive oil for spraying
  • sour cream for serving
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°. Shred the cheese and set aside about ¼ to ½ cup for topping the enchiladas.
  2. Spray an enchilada pan with oil and keep it handy. Heat a griddle or a large skillet over medium-high heat. Spray or brush the first tortilla on one side and place, oiled side down, on the griddle. Spray or brush the other side, while heating, and then flip. Remove from the heat and place in the enchilada pan.
  3. Working while the tortilla is still hot (but cool enough to handle), fill the center of the tortilla with cheese and roll it up. Place it seam side down in the enchilada pan, and repeat the process with the remaining tortillas.
  4. When the pan is full, spread the sauce over the enchiladas and sprinkle with black olives and the reserved cheese. Bake for 15 minutes, or until warm and bubbly. Serve topped with sour cream.

 

Sweet Potato and Chard Enchiladas

Not long ago, a friend sent me a clipping from the Austin American-Statesman. In her column Food Matters, Addie Broyles had tracked down the recipe for El Monumento’s swiss chard and sweet potato enchiladas. I knew at first look that this was a recipe I needed to try, but I also knew I’d need to have some time on my hands when I did it.

Last weekend, I had some time. My mom was over to visit, and she chased after Nora while the hubby worked on the finishing touches (finally!) to the paint in our entryway and I puttered around in the kitchen.

Sweet potato and chard enchiladas

This was a very different, healthy-but-not-healthy-tasting enchilada. My balsamic reduction was pretty ugly — I should have let it reduce past half to a more syrup-y consistency, but, lesson learned. It still tasted good! Next time I would strain the sauce, too, as the recipe provides, to give it a smoother texture.

We all ate the enchiladas up, served with refried black beans (homemade by the hubby) and brown rice on the side. What a delicious way to get your veggies!

Sweet Potato and Chard Enchiladas
Author: 
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 lb sweet potatoes, peeled and diced small
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large bunch chard, stems removed, roughly chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil, divided, plus more for brushing tortillas
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 guajillo chiles, stemmed and seeded
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed with the flat side of a chef's knife
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • 1½ cups heavy cream
  • ½ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 8 corn tortillas
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Toss the sweet potatoes with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast in a roasting pan until tender, 20-25 minutes, stirring a couple of times to ensure even browning.
  2. Heat 1 Tbsp canola oil in a large sauté pan over medium high heat. Add the chard and sauté until slightly wilted, then add the sweet potatoes and stir until the chard is tender. Season with salt and pepper to finish. Set aside.
  3. Meanwhile, heat 1 Tbsp canola oil over medium-high heat in a sauté pan. Sauté the onions, garlic and chiles until the onions are softened and translucent, then reduce the heat and continue cooking until the onions are caramelized.
  4. Add the walnuts and sauté until lightly toasted. Deglaze the pan with the white wine, then add the cream and simmer to reduce by one third.
  5. Let the mixture cool slightly, and then puree in a blender or food processor. Strain (if desired) and set aside.
  6. While the sauce is simmering, place the balsamic vinegar in a sauce pan, bring to a boil and simmer to reduce by half or more, until the consistency is syrupy and thick. Set aside.
  7. One by one, brush the tortillas with canola oil and heat briefly on each side on a griddle over medium heat.
  8. Fill each tortilla with the sweet potato-chard mixture, roll and place in an enchilada pan. Repeat for remaining servings.
  9. Ladle the walnut cream sauce over the enchiladas and drizzle with reduced balsamic vinegar.
  10. Warm to serving temperature, a few minutes in the oven. Serve with beans and rice.

 

The family that cooks together…

“We need a bigger kitchen.”

Those words actually came out of the hubby’s mouth, albeit in a joking manner, while we were making enchiladas last weekend. Our kitchen’s size wasn’t really the problem. The problem is that, while we used to cook together on a fairly regular basis, that just hasn’t been the case lately.

Since I transitioned out of working and into the role of primary chef (among other things), I cook most of the meals, except on the nights we grill, or nights when I have something planned out of the house. The hubby is a good sport in his role as primary dish-doer. However, we both do enjoy cooking (sometimes), and when you’re making an elaborate meal, things always go faster with two in the kitchen. Well, once you get that delicate dance down to an art, anyway.

We found a nice balance by dividing up the duties (I made enchilada sauce while he made the filling and rolled the enchiladas) and trying to stay out of each other’s way as much as possible, but there is still work to be done. I, for one, will readily acknowledge that I need to reign in my control freak tendencies.

So, if you cook with your partner, what are your tips for keeping the harmony in the kitchen? How do you avoid bossing each other around or stepping on each other’s toes (literally and figuratively)?

Just to show I’m a good sport here, I’m including a recipe for the enchiladas we made. They were delicious!

Yes, please.

Cook ’em with someone you love.

Chard and Mushroom Enchiladas with Hatch Green Chile Sauce

For enchiladas:
2 Tbsp canola oil, plus more for softening tortillas
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
1 onion, chopped
4 cups chard or other tender greens, coarse stems removed and coarsely chopped
8 oz cremini mushrooms, sliced
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp flour
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated, plus more for topping
6-8 corn tortillas

For sauce:
12 Hatch green chiles, roasted, peeled, stemmed and seeded
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
2 Tbs canola oil

First, make the sauce. Place the chiles in a pan and cover with water. Simmer for about 30 minutes, then cool slightly. Blend the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a pan and sauté the onion and garlic. Add the chile puree and salt to taste.

Preheat the oven to 375°. Heat 2 Tbsp canola oil in a large skillet and sauté the garlic and onion until soft and golden. Add the mushrooms and the chard by batches and stir until cooked down.

In a small saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat, and stir in the flour. Cook for a couple of minutes, or until golden, and then gradually add the milk, stirring to incorporate. Simmer over medium heat until slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and stir in the cheese. Stir the cheese mixture into the cooked greens and mushrooms.

Fill the bottom of a small skillet with a generous amount of canola oil (1/4-1/2 inch deep) and heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot and shimmering, carefully add the first tortilla with tongs. Fry briefly, just to soften, and then remove to a plate covered with paper towels to drain. When cool enough to handle (but still warm), fill the center of the tortilla with the greens mixture, roll, and place in a lightly oiled enchilada pan. Repeat with the other tortillas.

Pour the sauce over the enchiladas and sprinkle with the remaining cheddar. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until hot and bubbly.

It’s Hatch chile season!

It is our first Hatch chile season back in Austin, and I am psyched! I don’t know why these little beauties are not the big, fat deal in other places that they seem to be here, but they are amazing.

When we lived in Northern California, the only place we could find them was at a Nob Hill close(ish) to our house, before it closed and turned into an Asian market. It’s kind of a long story, but we found an alternate supplier eventually, although, honest-to-goodness, it involved a San Francisco-to-New Mexico exchange of sourdough bread for green chiles.

Anyway… we’d buy a good 10 lbs of Hatch green chiles when they appeared in the produce case (got some weird looks doing that!), and then the hubby would spend all day one weekend roasting them on the grill. We’d feast on them — a couple of years we even threw a Hatch chile party! — and then freeze the rest, either whole or as enchilada sauce, to use throughout the year… or at least for as long as they lasted.

Hatch chile season is only a couple of weeks in late August, but people here go crazy for it. Chuy’s has a special Hatch green chile menu. Central Market, one of the big local gourmet groceries, features everything from Hatch green chile scones to homemade Hatch salsa to cheese with Hatch chiles. The best part, though? You can buy chiles roasted right there in the store to do with as you will.

Oh yeah.

No more day-long roasting extravaganza!

We’ve been hard at work in the kitchen lately, putting our Hatch green chiles to good use. Hatch black bean burgers were a hit.

Green chile deliciousness.

For a simple dinner the other night, the hubby made Hatch quesadillas with Hatch-studded queso quesadilla and slices of Hatch chiles, topped with a delicious Hatch salsa verde we picked up at the farmer’s market.

Could it be any more Hatch?

We also made Hatch popcorn, and even Hatch breakfast tacos, complete with homemade tortillas.*

* More on that later. I think I’m going to get the hubby to blog about it, since he was the chef. They were absolutely delicious and nowhere near as hard as I expected they’d be.

I think I may try my hand at a Hatch green chile mac and cheese this week. And, as a special treat, I’ll be infusing some Hatch green chile tequila to try and replicate the New Mexican martini I blogged about a while back. Look for a guest post about that over at Boozed + Infused sometime soon.

I’ll leave you with my all-time favorite recipe for Hatch green chile enchilada sauce, which is super-simple and freezes very well. If you haven’t tried these beauties, they’re worth searching for!

Hatch Green Chile Enchilada Sauce

12 Hatch green chiles, stemmed and seeded
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
2 Tbs canola oil

Place the chiles in a pan and cover with water. Simmer for about 30 minutes, then cool slightly. Blend the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a pan and sauté the onion and garlic. Add the chile puree and salt to taste. Heat to serving temperature, or cool and freeze for later use.

Roasted tomatillo sauce with green tomatoes

We got tomatillos in our CSA box last week, and that means it’s enchilada time!

Yessss!

I totally winged it on the sauce, and it came out great. Even more so, since it turned out that what I thought at first glace were lemon cucumbers in the box turned out to be green tomatoes! I saved the bulk of them to fry (of course!), but I threw a few in the sauce for good measure. It really balanced it out well.

I have always been pretty picky about tomatillo sauce, since it has the potential to be too acidic and assertive for my taste, but, with a little tweaking on the seasoning, this really did the trick. I used it as a sauce for a pan of cheese enchiladas, accented with some caramelized onions left over from grilled pizzas, but it would be great as just a salsa to enjoy with chips — take your pick!

Roasted Tomatillo Sauce with Green Tomatoes

1 lb tomatillos
2-3 small green tomatoes, chopped
1/4 cup cilantro
1/2 onion, roughly chopped
1 serrano pepper, sliced
1 clove garlic, sliced
2/3 cup vegetable stock
juice of one lime
salt

Toss the tomatillos with a little olive oil, and roast them in their husks on the grill over medium high heat, using a vegetable grate. When the husks are crispy and a little scorched, they are done. Set aside to cool.

Remove the husks from the cooled tomatillos. Place the tomatillos in a blender with the other ingredients and purée. Adjust lime juice and salt to taste.

Spinach and mushroom enchiladas

I was perusing one of my favorite cookbooks (Deborah Madison’s Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone) for menu ideas, and I happened on a recipe for mushroom enchiladas. Given the hubby’s newfound receptivity to mushroom-centric cuisine, and our lack of CSA veggies at the time, I decided to pencil it in.

Our first CSA delivery came last Friday, and the box contained a beautiful bunch of spinach, along with a couple of other types of greens (which I am currently holding in reserve for other projects). So, I thought, why not spinach and mushroom enchiladas?

Good call.

I didn’t even end up glancing at the original recipe I had chosen, so this recipe is truly winging it. I also used *gasp* packaged enchilada sauce. Normally I would pull some of my own hatch green chile sauce out of the freezer, but that wasn’t an option this time. So, Frontera it was, and I was actually really impressed.

Good stuff.

The hubby couldn’t believe it wasn’t freshly made sauce. I’d highly recommend it if you’re pressed for time.

Spinach and Mushroom Enchiladas

1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
10 oz brown mushrooms, roughly chopped
1 bunch spinach, stemmed and roughly chopped.
2 Tbs olive oil
6 corn tortillas
canola oil for frying
1 cup grated Monterrey Jack cheese, shredded
enchilada sauce of your choice

Preheat the oven to 350. Saute the onion and garlic in the olive oil until they begin to soften. Add the mushrooms and stir until they begin to release their juices. Add the spinach and stir until wilted. Remove from heat and cool, and then drain and press out any extra moisture.* Stir in 1/4 cup of the cheese.

Fill the bottom of a small skillet with a generous amount of canola oil (1/4-1/2 inch deep) and heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot and shimmering, carefully add the first tortilla with tongs. Fry briefly, just to soften, and then remove to a plate covered with paper towels to drain. When cool enough to handle (but still warm), fill the center of the tortilla with the mushroom and spinach mixture, roll, and place in a lightly oiled enchilada pan. Repeat with the other tortillas.

Pour the sauce over the enchiladas and sprinkle with the remaining cheese. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until hot and bubbly. Serve with sour cream.

* No need to go crazy here. You just want to make sure the mixture doesn’t make the tortillas soggy. I drained mine over the sink and used a couple of paper towels to blot a bit.

Chard enchiladas

One of my favorite things to do with chard is to make enchiladas. I know it sounds weird, but they are soooo good. Really.

I will admit that I once thought that nothing could be better than a plate of greasy cheese enchiladas with refried beans and rice and plenty of chips and salsa on the side, and nary a green vegetable to be found. Chard enchiladas are not necessarily better than a classic plate of enchiladas — they are just different. I am a Texas girl at heart, and I do still love some Tex-Mex, when I can find it, but given the choice between some Chuy’s enchiladas and a plate of homemade chard enchiladas, I’d have to stop and think.

We had a bunch of chard leftover recently, and some time on our hands, so we decided to make enchiladas. This is not really a complicated or time-consuming recipe, but it does make quite a mess, especially if you soften the tortillas in oil.* But it’s worth the clean-up, I promise!

*Which you should, because it really makes them a lot better.

Although hubby and I fundamentally disagree on the direction in which you should roll enchiladas, we definitely agree that this makes for a tasty meal, especially when served with some refried black beans and a Shiner Bock!

Delicious.

Solve this for me, people: Should enchiladas be rolled so that the crease faces up, or down? I know I’m right, but I need some proof from the internets. So that you remain unbiased, I will not disclose which of us rolled the batch pictured above. We both have pretty good logic behind our opinions and, as usual, we both feel strongly about this issue.

In any case, here’s the recipe. Enjoy, no matter which way you roll!

Chard enchiladas
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil, plus more for softening tortillas
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 cups chard or other greens*, coarsely chopped
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 1 Tbsp flour
  • ½ cup milk
  • ½ cup cheddar cheese, grated, plus more for topping
  • 6-8 corn tortillas
  • salsa for topping
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°. Heat 2 Tbsp canola oil in a large skillet and sauté garlic and onion until soft and golden. Add chard by batches and stir until it is cooked down.
  2. In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat, and stir in flour. Cook for a couple of minutes, or until golden, and then gradually add the milk, stirring to incorporate. Simmer over medium heat until slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and stir in the cheese. Stir the cheese mixture into the cooked greens.
  3. Fill the bottom of a small skillet with a generous amount of canola oil (1/4-1/2 inch deep) and heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot and shimmering, carefully add the first tortilla with tongs. Fry briefly, just to soften, and then remove to a plate covered with paper towels to drain. When cool enough to handle (but still warm), fill the center of the tortilla with the greens mixture, roll, and place in a lightly oiled enchilada pan. Repeat with the other tortillas.
  4. Pour salsa over the enchiladas and sprinkle with the remaining cheddar. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until hot and bubbly. Serve with sour cream.
Notes
*Although these are best with chard, you can use pretty much any type of greens for the filling, provided they're pretty tender. I discovered not too long ago that spigariello doesn't work too well in this recipe, since, although it is similar to kale, it retains a firmer tooth when cooked. For this particular batch, we used a combination of kohlrabi greens and red chard.

 

Chard Enchiladas
Original recipe from Mariquita Farms, with my modifications

2 Tbsp canola oil, plus more for softening tortillas
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 onion, chopped
4 cups chard or other greens*, coarsely chopped
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp flour
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup cheddar cheese, grated, plus more for topping
6-8 corn tortillas
salsa for topping

Preheat oven to 375°. Heat 2 Tbsp canola oil in a large skillet and sauté garlic and onion until soft and golden. Add chard by batches and stir until it is cooked down.

In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat, and stir in flour. Cook for a couple of minutes, or until golden, and then gradually add the milk, stirring to incorporate. Simmer over medium heat until slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and stir in the cheese. Stir the cheese mixture into the cooked greens.

Fill the bottom of a small skillet with a generous amount of canola oil (1/4-1/2 inch deep) and heat over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot and shimmering, carefully add the first tortilla with tongs. Fry briefly, just to soften, and then remove to a plate covered with paper towels to drain. When cool enough to handle (but still warm), fill the center of the tortilla with the greens mixture, roll, and place in a lightly oiled enchilada pan. Repeat with the other tortillas.

Pour salsa over the enchiladas and sprinkle with the remaining cheddar. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until hot and bubbly. Serve with sour cream.

*Although these are best with chard, you can use pretty much any type of greens for the filling, provided they’re pretty tender. I discovered not too long ago that spigariello doesn’t work too well in this recipe, since, although it is similar to kale, it retains a firmer tooth when cooked. For this particular batch, we used a combination of kohlrabi greens and red chard.

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